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Watch Video: Family of late JB Danquah-Adu Invokes Curses On Killer


The spokesperson of the family of J.B. Danquah-Adu, the late MP for Abuakwa North, has said the increasing tendency among Ghanaians to resort to curses to settle grievances is an indication that people are losing trust in the judicial system of the country.

Mr. George Amoah said the trend could go a long way to entrench a culture of reprisals in the country.

Mr. Amoah gave the warning on Ghana Yensom, Accra100.5 FM’s breakfast show, on Monday. His comments arose from the invocation of curses during the funeral of Mr. Danquah-Adu by a fetish priest on persons who played a role in the murder of the lawmaker.

Mr. J.B. Danquah died on Tuesday, February 9, 2016, at his Shiashie residence in Accra from multiple stab wounds allegedly inflicted on him by 19-year-old Daniel Asiedu, who remains in the custody of the Bureau of National Investigations (BNI).

Mr. Amoah lamented the snail’s pace of police investigations, telling host Chief Jerry Forson that too little information had been made available despite several weeks of the MP’s murder.

“It’s the police that has the power to undertake investigations and inform us all of whatever findings they have made. It’s been some time since the suspect was arrested. We feel elsewhere conclusions from investigations into the incident would have been made known to the public, so, everyone picks a lesson from it, to ensure it does not happen again,” he said.

“So, all I say is, we are asking for justice. If in a country like ours, the justice system does not work, curses such as these will result, because ‘an eye for an eye’ will become the order of the day since we don’t trust the system, just the same way we do not know where this case is headed.

“The suspect is complaining about the quality of food he is offered. A beggar with a choice! It is strange. It appears an unseen hand was involved in the murder he committed, and that is our suspicion. There’s a big unseen hand behind the young man preventing the truth from coming to light. This is our problem. So, you hear people hurling curses everywhere. It means that when it goes that way, people are losing interest in our justice system. And it’s dangerous for any country to go that way.”

Watch the video below:

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